Global Video Index

The Millennials are changing the viewing patterns across many devices; according to analysts. They are the cord never, the mobile-first generation and former pirates driving this global phenomenon. And this is almost universal across many regions – essentially the same – at least when it comes to mobile devices and the video they watch on them. Millennials are a distinctly global generation, sharing more similarities than generations before them, and they’re driving us to a digital homogeneity that is distinctly mobile. Ooyala’s Keith Budge, Vice President and General Manager, Asia-Pacific and Japan shares his views in this global video index with Television Asia.


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Keith Budge, VP/GM for Asia Pacific and Japan, Ooyala Keith Budge, VP/GM for Asia Pacific and Japan, Ooyala

Engagement patterns by device

There’s a common cliché in our industry that says the bigger the screen, the better. Well, it may be cliché, but it’s also true. The biggest screens, connected televisions, have seen their share of time watched for content longer than 10 minutes increase steadily over the past year. From Q1’s 43% to Q2’s 53%, Q3’s 71% and Q4’s 74%, a growth of more than 72% over 12 months. On the tablets, meanwhile, the share of time watched for the same content has declined slightly to 54% in Q4 from 55% in Q3 and 59% in Q1.Computers had a share of watch time of 38% for content longer than 10 minutes, essentially

Computers had a share of watch time of 38% for content longer than 10 minutes, essentially fl at for the quarter; the share has been vacillating between 35% and 40% for the entire year. And mobile phones rang up a share of time watched to 31%, the same as in Q3. Computers’ share of time watched from 0 to 3 minutes was 43%, followed by mobile phones (40%), tablets (24%) and CTVs (20%), reinforcing viewing trends that have been in place for several quarters (See Figure 1). Small screens and computers remain the screens of choice for video vignettes, movie trailers and content like music videos. However, mobile phones remained the device of choice for watching short video content under 10 minutes. For the second quarter in a row, 69% of all videos watched on smartphones were under 10 minutes long, a slight increase since the beginning of 2015. Tablet share of time watched for content 10-30 minutes in length grew for the third consecutive quarter to 21%, the most out of any device for that length of content. Computers also increased their share of time watched for longer content over 30 minutes. It was the third consecutive quarter of growth for computers.

However, mobile phones remained the device of choice for watching short video content under 10 minutes. For the second quarter in a row, 69% of all videos watched on smartphones were under 10 minutes long, a slight increase since the beginning of 2015. Tablet share of time watched for content 10-30 minutes in length grew for the third consecutive quarter to 21%, the most out of any device for that length of content. Computers also increased their share of time watched for longer content over 30 minutes. It was the third consecutive quarter of growth for computers.

Long form video: Share of time watched by device and video length – Q4 2015

Content continues to flow online and to all devices. Increasingly, much of it is long-form premium content that, at the demand of consumers, is being delivered over-the-top. Everything from episodic TV to longer dramas, movies, news and sports has become regular fare online. Still, a vast amount of short-form content is being consumed on mobile devices, an almost made-to-order delivery system that better matches up with modern lifestyles. The price of data is coming down, and operators increasingly are designing new ways to deliver more content without eating up subscribers’ data. U.S. operators AT&T and Verizon, for example, are experimenting with sponsored content, where content owners pay to offset a user’s data consumption, and SVOD companies like Netflix continue to develop bandwidth- saving codecs to better compress content, again being sensitive to viewers’ pocketbooks. As more quality content comes online from broadcasters, via operator initiatives and from content owners going direct to consumers, competition for eyeballs will ramp up and easy engagement will disappear. Now, more than ever, data and predictive analytics will be crucial to measuring viewer engagement and minimising churn.

U.S. operators AT&T and Verizon, for example, are experimenting with sponsored content, where content owners pay to offset a user’s data consumption, and SVOD companies like Netflix continue to develop bandwidth- saving codecs to better compress content, again being sensitive to viewers’ pocketbooks. As more quality content comes online from broadcasters, via operator initiatives and from content owners going direct to consumers, competition for eyeballs will ramp up and easy engagement will disappear. Now, more than ever, data and predictive analytics will be crucial to measuring viewer engagement and minimising churn.

Spotlight on Asia-Pacific and Japan

In the fourth quarter, we took a look at the viewing habits of consumers in 15 countries in the Asia-Pacific region, where Ooyala sees high traffic across its footprint.



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