TV still the most influential platform for kids

Cartoon Network’s New Generations latest study reveals trends and media habits of Australian kids.


&TV Australia Boomerang Cartoon Network Facebook kids New Generations 2016 POGO Snapchat Toonami Turner YouTube

Sydney – Kids’ media consumption in Australia has increased over the past year, with their total spending power rising to A$1.8 billion annually, Cartoon Network’s annual leading research study into children and parents New Generations 2016 has found.

The report revealed that TV ads are still the most effective for reaching children, with watching TV remaining the top media consumption activity for kids. An impressive 92% of children watched TV in the last month – up 8%, with most tuning in to watch cartoons. The report also highlighted that kids prefer ads that feature comedy and characters, with Captain Risky (Budget Direct) the most liked ad for kids, followed by Unicorn Pooping (Squatty Potty) and McDonald’s.

Three times more kids find ads on TV funny compared to ads on social media and twice as many children notice ads on TV compared to social media. A significant 58% of parents surveyed cited TV as the most influential advertising platform for kids.

David Webb, Director of Research at Turner Asia Pacific, parent company of Cartoon Network and sister-brands Boomerang, POGO and Toonami, commented on the results, saying: “This year, the theme of the study was ‘connecting with kids’ and it was interesting to see that, even as children are creating their own online video content, and despite the popularity of social media, TV ads are still significantly more effective for reaching them. Also, that regardless of the platform, relatable and humorous content generally cuts through and resonates with young audiences – a demographic with considerable purchasing influence.”



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